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Methodist Boerne Emergency Center

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Methodist Children's Hospital

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Methodist Hospital

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Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital

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Methodist Stone Oak Hospital

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Methodist Texsan Hospital

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Metropolitan Methodist Emergency Center at the Quarry

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Metropolitan Methodist Hospital

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Northeast Methodist Hospital

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Skin Cancer and Melanoma

Skin cancer is when cancer cells grow in the skin. The two most common kinds of skin cancer are:

  • Basal cell carcinoma —This is the most common type of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma develops in the outermost layer of skin. This cancer usually grows slowly and does not spread to other tissues in the body.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma —This cancer develops in the uppermost layer of skin cells. Squamous cell carcinoma usually grows slowly. However, in some cases it can grow fast and spread to other tissues in the body. If treated early this type of cancer is rarely fatal. However, the cancer can be fatal if it spreads beyond the skin.

It is important that skin cancers be found and treated early. If left untreated, they can quickly invade and destroy nearby tissue.

Understanding Skin Cancer: HealthSource Library, News and Resources

 


Melanoma is skin cancer of the melanocytes, the cells that produce skin color and give moles their dark color.

Moles are collections of melanocytes. Normally, moles are benign. Sometimes, however, a mole can develop into melanoma. A new mole may also be an early sign of melanoma. The three major types of skin cancer are basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma. Basal cell and squamous cell are the two most common. Melanomas account for less than 5% of all skin cancer cases; however, they are more dangerous because they are far more likely to spread to other parts of the body.
 

Understanding Melanoma: HealthSource Library, News and Resources

 
Melanoma occurs when melanocytes divide without control or order. The disease typically starts in the skin, but it also may arise in other areas where melanocytes are found, such as in the eyes, digestive system, nail beds, or lymph nodes.

Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is the main cause of skin cancer. Artificial radiation from sun lamps and tanning booths can also cause skin cancer. Exposure to sun is the primary cause of melanoma, although some patients have a hereditary predisposition to develop these malignancies.

According to the American Cancer Society 76,690 people in the United States will be diagnosed with melanoma in the year 2013.

 


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